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Cherokee
04-14-2009, 03:07 AM
I've always hunted squirrel with .22. Never hunted rabbit before ( had a freind who raised them for meat, got one when I wanted one ).

Which 12 gauge shot is best for small game?
Which size for small bird?

ozzie
04-14-2009, 04:21 AM
I use # 6 shot for birds and rabbits

Done Deal
04-14-2009, 06:25 AM
I've always hunted squirrel with .22. Never hunted rabbit before ( had a freind who raised them for meat, got one when I wanted one ).

Which 12 gauge shot is best for small game?
Which size for small bird?

What kinda small birds?

For Woodcock and grouse 7.5's are ok.

protectionisamust
04-14-2009, 10:46 AM
I use:

2 3/4" # 7 for Rabbit's, woodcock, etc...

3" # 6 for Pheasants

3" # 5 for Turkey

Mr. 16 gauge
04-14-2009, 03:15 PM
For most small game/birds I prefer 1 oz to 1 1/8 oz of #6 shot. That includes grouse/partridge. For woodcock/quail, I use #7 (NOT 7.5!). Lost a lot of birds in the past using 7.5...haven't since I switched to 7s (and yes, I know it's only .005 bigger.....but that has been my experience). If I'm hunting both grouse & woodcock, I will use #7 for the first round and #6 for the second shot.
For pheasants, I prefer #5, #4, and #6, in that order....in 1 1/4 oz payloads. All are 2 3/4" shells.
I use these guidelines in both 12 & 16 gauge.

Mainspring
04-14-2009, 08:05 PM
#6 works for everything that 00 Buck doesn't work for.

:popcorn:

Cherokee
04-15-2009, 03:08 AM
I am looking for 1 all around good small game/bird shot. Wanting to stock some for a just-in-case. Seems #6 is prefered the most. I seen at Walmart, a 100 round box for something less than $24. Only had 7 and 8 though. I'll have to keep my eye open for 6.

Yes, I have a bunch of 00 and some slugs.

ready4pullback
04-15-2009, 10:56 AM
I use a 20 for all my bird hunting. #6's or #5's for Pheasant, #7.5 for grouse and woodcock. Never seem to have an issue. 6's on a woodcock from a 12 might leave them a little "loose" considering the range you're usually shooting them from... grouse you'd probably be just fine.

huntmeister
04-15-2009, 09:21 PM
I use #7.5 for upland birds and rabbit, just adjust the choke tube for the game I'm hunting, choke consriction needs to be taken into consideration along with shot size. I use .22 mag for squirral.

Grouse and woody's with 12ga O/U 1st bbl is imp cylinder 2nd is skeet II.

Pheasant with 12ga O/U is mod then full.

rabbit I use 20ga with eiather a full or a imp cylinder depends on location im hunting.

Turkey is a hevi shot superfull choke tube in my 870 with the old remington branded #6 hevi shot.

Goose 3.5" BB in full 870 super-mag


For woodcock/quail, I use #7 (NOT 7.5!). Lost a lot of birds in the past using 7.5...haven't since I switched to 7s (and yes, I know it's only .005 bigger.....but that has been my experience). If I'm hunting both grouse & woodcock, I will use #7 for the first round and #6 for the second shot.


QUESTION:
Who makes lead #7's, I like that idea of #7's rather then 7.5

http://www.shotgunworld.com/shot_sizes.jpg

Mr. 16 gauge
04-16-2009, 09:49 AM
QUESTION:
Who makes lead #7's, I like that idea of #7's rather then 7.5




Hello;
I just checked the bag, and the company that makes it is called "West Coast Shot, Inc.", out of Carson City, NV. The only place that I've found that has it consistantly is The Hock shop up in Pt. Huron. I've miked a few pellets from each bag I bought, and they do mike out to .10, so they are 'true' #7 shot.

huntmeister
04-16-2009, 04:08 PM
Hello;
I just checked the bag, and the company that makes it is called "West Coast Shot, Inc.", out of Carson City, NV. The only place that I've found that has it consistantly is The Hock shop up in Pt. Huron. I've miked a few pellets from each bag I bought, and they do mike out to .10, so they are 'true' #7 shot.

I don't reload my own, but a friend is getting into reloading shots shells thanks for the info selected and printed, looks like I'm stuck with factory 7.5's for a while.

ShootinFool
04-16-2009, 10:25 PM
#6 is a good bet but I try to hunt my rabbits and squirrels with .22LR. It takes more work to do it that way but it saves my teeth from the hidden shot. Shot can be hard to completely remove from small game. With a .22, you just take out one bullet and you're good to go.

Done Deal
04-18-2009, 02:13 PM
For me, shot selection depends on a variety of factors.

As already mentioned, the type of game comes into play.

So does the choke constriction (and patterning of each size shot in that particular choke at a variety of ranges----we all do that right?)

Next comes the type of cover I will be hunting. Obviously, early season means foliage and denser cover so....closer shots.

Later in the year, yardages tend to increase (for a variety of reasons) and the critters we are after are sporting winter coats. Therefore, larger shot is in order and tighter chokes generally are preferable as well.


For example, I kill a early geese over decoys over 3" 2's. As things change....I go up to BB's or BBB's and 3.5's for more shot. I guess if I was pass shooting birds....the 10 gauge might even get out of the safe.

Another example would be....for early season pats or woodcock's I will kill as many birds as you with a sawed off single shot 12 spitting 7 1/2's.

I don't use that low brass cheap stuff for anything but doves and...I haven't been to Indiana in awhile. Oops...almost forgot....in steel it makes for great swatter loads when diver hunting.

For turkeys.....there are basically three shot size choices and....smart money says for close shots smaller shot and larger shot for less wind drift when stretching the barrel.

I am certainly no guru but....have managed to become a fairly proficient killer over the years. As far as I am concerned, you kind of owe it to the game you pursue to do your homework so you too are a killer instead of a crippler.

Good luck.

Passport
05-02-2009, 08:06 PM
Rosters - #4 shot, 2 3/4 12 ga
Raggits - #6 in any gauge
Grouse - 7.5 early, #6 late season
Timberdoodle - aka Woodcock - 7.5
Tree rat - #6 in .410
House cat - #5 are handy

langenc
05-02-2009, 08:30 PM
Have not bought any shells in several years. Read some, on line way too much (according to wife), hung around trap/skeet club and I have never heard of 7's??

Has something changed??

Passport
05-02-2009, 10:08 PM
Have not bought any shells in several years. Read some, on line way too much (according to wife), hung around trap/skeet club and I have never heard of 7's??

Has something changed??



#7 shot is pretty much a Europen thing, I dont know of any American mfg making them. Look to B&P and other across the pond mfg for #7. Truth be told you will see no diff what so ever with #7.5's or 8's for tha matter.....

Done Deal
05-03-2009, 06:20 AM
#7 shot is pretty much a Europen thing, I dont know of any American mfg making them. Look to B&P and other across the pond mfg for #7. Truth be told you will see no diff what so ever with #7.5's or 8's for tha matter.....

Maybe not in shot size but, 7.5's are high brass and aren't most 8's low brass shells?

Passport
05-03-2009, 10:33 AM
Maybe not in shot size but, 7.5's are high brass and aren't most 8's low brass shells?


Not always, most US made 7.5 and 8 shot will be of a low brass configuration. Again I see more high brass stuff of the same shot size from overseas. Plus the overseas shotgun ammo usually has a higher ammount of antimony, thus making the shot harder and making 1oz 12 ga ammo a real long range bomber due to less pellet deformaton. As a general rule the cheeper the ammo the lower antimonty.

If you'er use is skeet and trap most any of the cheep WalMart ammo is fine assumng its a load with a plastic wad, not a confetti load, avoid them at all costs.

If Soprting Clays is the game I would opt for better ammo as shots can be long.

MichaelT
05-04-2009, 05:21 PM
I just use 7.5's for everything. Rabbits, squirrels, pheasants, clays. I might be more likely to buy different sizes for different animals, but 7.5's work well for me, nothing has gotten up after I shoot it.

willforu1
05-04-2009, 06:14 PM
I would like to add that I treat pen raised pheasants differently than hunting wild ones. I use 3" 6 shot for for wild birds and 2 3/4 for perserve birds.

Bestboss
05-07-2009, 12:03 AM
WOW! I never considered using 3" magnums on a phesant. I was taught by an old time phesant shooter to use high brass 7 1/2's and shoot them when they are going away. There is some merit to his belief that the brest feathers will deflect a lot of shot. Same with most bigger birds.
But for most hunting, the tried and true #6's usually get thrown in, if I do not have a specific prey in mind. They pretty much cover my needs on my walkabouts.
Larry

Sargeyork
05-07-2009, 05:09 AM
5 and 6 shot if you are going to shoot into weeds and brush, small birds in the air you can use 7 1/2's, if your gonna kill something have at least 1 1/8 oz of lead, more is better and use a modified or tighter choke. Pheasants use 5 or 6 shot and don't spare the powder. :ak2:

willforu1
05-10-2009, 10:11 PM
Just a comment. I use #6 3 Inch Magnums for pheasant. I found that this is over kill for range birds. I have destroyed too much meat. I will save these for wild birds where you can shoot roosters only or have to take longer shots.

For range birds on a pheasant farm 2 3/4 12 or 20 gauge are fine. My friends and I have used #4s, #6, and #7 1/2 shot and killed birds.